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By Marc Heller, DC Learn Back Pain Exercises to Relieve Low Back Pain The very first time a yoga teacher told to me to lean forward against a wall to do a modified down dog (wall dog), I was petrified. My lower back, my discs, do not like sustained flexion. The yoga teacher showed me that the goal was to lengthen the spine and keep it in neutral. Once I got over my fear, the modified down dog became a mainstay of my disc exercise routines. I am reminded of this because foundation training uses a "braced spine" position as a way to strengthen and tone the back extensors, in concert with activating the wholeposterior chain. Eric Goodman, the chiropractor / trainer who developed

By Ben Preston Alexandra Stevenson has been holding a tennis racket ever since she can remember. The decision to go pro at 18 took her from the relative comfort of a scholarship offer at UCLA and thrust her into the pressure cooker of competition. It also exposed her body to the kind of beating that mere mortals can only dream about. Having suffered a number of injury-related setbacks over the ensuing years, Stevenson thought her career was through by 2010. But then, something changed. After being carried off a Sydney court with a foot injury in February of last year, she decided to try a new kind of training program called Foundation Roots, a regimen focused on lower back and posterior muscle movement.

In this talk Dr. Eric Goodman discusses altered human movement patterns that have led to increasing levels of physical degeneration and chronic injury. The effect of modern technology can be seen and felt daily. Recognizing the significant role proper movement plays in in our overall health is the most important step in beginning to remedy the epidemic of chronic pain. This talk will leave listeners inspired as Eric shows us what the return to our fundamental movement pattern looks and feels like and shares extraordinary stories of what can happen when you teach your body to move as it is designed.

By Selene Yeager - I feel like my cycling, training life is a bit like a Chinese buffet right now. A few favorites, a few new flavors, some stuff I’m not sure about, but hey, why not give it a whirl? Here’s a look at what’s on my plate and why: Cyclocross: I’ve always really enjoyed this muddy mash up of cycling, running and roller derby. This year, I’m loving it. I ride hard, get heckled, try to pick good lines, and simply have fun. If you haven’t tried it yet, I encourage you to take a stab. You’ll be back for more. Swimming: I’m only going once a week. But it’s just what I need on a Monday morning after ‘cross racing (see above) and

By Geoff Lepper - With 2,023 minutes already logged and seven matches remaining, San Jose Earthquakes captain Ramiro Corrales is on pace to play more minutes this year than he has in any MLS season since 1999. Did the 34-year-old, who had to take cortisone shots in preseason to relieve his persistent back pain, find the fountain of youth? No, he just got a really good book recommendation from Quakes assistant coach Mark Watson: “Foundation: Redefine Your Core, Conquer Back Pain and Move with Confidence,” written by Summerland, Calif., back specialist Dr. Eric Goodman, who has worked with a number of athletes, including those on the US Olympic water polo team. “It’s been helping me a lot,” Corrales told MLSsoccer.com. “[The back pain] was

By Dorene Internicola - (Reuters Life!) - Crunches, curls and sit-ups may be standard workout fare in gyms, basements and living rooms across the land. But the authors of a new book suggest people get plenty of that movement in their daily lives. They say to get a really strong midsection the back of the body needs to be worked. "Sitting at desks, working on computers, waiting in traffic, we are continually contracting our abs, throwing our shoulders forward and, ultimately, shutting down the back of the body, said Dr. Eric Goodman, co-author with Peter Park of "Foundation: Redefine Your Core, Conquer Back Pain, and Move with Confidence." "If we're going to keep our posture and our spines strong, it has to be done

By Selene Yeager - Strengthen and Stretch for More Effective Riding All those hours hunched in the saddle come at a cost. "The small muscles in the front of your body (hip flexors, quads) work harder relative to your largest muscle group (low back, glutes, hamstrings)," says Santa Barbara, California-based chiropractor Eric Goodman. The result? A lopsided tug-of-war that can cause a world of hurt--and ineffective riding. This sequence strengthens posterior muscles and stretches the ones in front. Do it three or four times a week. START HERE FOUNDATION SQUAT A. Stand with feet slightly wider than shoulder width. B. Extend your arms until they're shoulder-height and lower yourself into a squat. Press through your heels to come back to start. Do 10. GOOD MORNING A. Stand with legs shoulder-width apart,

By: Andrew Daniels For the first time in his life, Lance Armstrong was fat. It was the summer of 2008, and the former cycling superstar was already three years deep into his retirement from professional sports—if you can call crisscrossing the globe to spread cancer awareness and only occasionally finding time to relax “retirement.” Exercise—once a daily staple—was now a luxury. Something to fit in when time allowed. And it showed. He was, in the words of strength and conditioning coach Peter Park, kind of pudgy. That might be hard to believe about a man who amassed seven consecutive Tour de France victories from 1999 to 2005, but that’s exactly what Park faced when Armstrong showed up at his Santa Barbara-based gym, Platinum